Data Security
BETHESDA, Md. — Marriott says fewer guest records were compromised than feared in a previously announced data breach.
SAINT JOHN, N.B. — As many as 6,000 people in Saint John, N.B., could have had their personal information exposed, an analyst group said as the city announced it was one of dozens of municipalities affected by a data breach to its online parking ticket payment system.
WASHINGTON — U.S. officials on Thursday said two alleged Chinese hackers carried out an extensive campaign on behalf of Beijing's main intelligence agency to steal trade secrets and other information from government agencies and “a who's who” of major corporations in the United States and nearly a dozen other nations.
OTTAWA — Companies in Canada were among the targets of two Chinese citizens charged with waging an extensive hacking campaign to steal valuable data over many years, U.S. authorities say.
DONGGUAN, China — The chairman of Huawei challenged the United States and other governments to provide evidence for claims the Chinese tech giant is a security risk as the company launched a public relations effort Tuesday to defuse fears that threaten its role in next-generation communications.
OTTAWA — Allowing Chinese firm Huawei Technologies to help build Canada's 5G wireless networks could give Beijing backdoor access to revealing data about Canadians, security analysts warn.
WASHINGTON — Investigators believe hackers working on behalf of China's main intelligence agency are responsible for a massive data breach involving the theft of personal information from as many as 500 million guests of the Marriott hotel chain, a U.S. official said Tuesday.
OTTAWA — National security “comes first” in deciding whether to allow Huawei Technologies to take part in developing Canada's 5G telecommunications network, Infrastructure Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne says.
OTTAWA — Canada's privacy watchdog says he's worried that privacy rights in Canada are being cast aside as both public and private entities rush to mine digital data from citizens and customers.
MELBOURNE, Australia — A newly enacted law rushed through Australia's parliament will compel technology companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google to disable encryption protections so police can better pursue terrorists and other criminals.

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