Data Security
REGINA — Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is facing criticism from the Opposition for using a private email server to do government business.
TOKYO — The worldwide “ransomware” cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers.
SAN FRANCISCO — Google said it shut down an email spam campaign that impersonated its online file service, Google Docs.
TORONTO — Indigo Books & Music Inc. says it has reset passwords for a number of its customers’ online Indigo accounts after noticing unauthorized access.
Symantec, the makers of Norton security products, has released its annual Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR), finding cyber criminals revealed new levels of ambition in 2016 — “a year marked by extraordinary attacks, including multi-million dollar virtual bank heists and overt attempts to disrupt the U.S. electoral process by state-sponsored groups”.
OTTAWA — The controversial data-crunching centre run by Canada’s spy agency has long been using personal details gleaned from security clearance forms to help with national security probes — a practice that worries the federal privacy watchdog, newly disclosed letters show.
PARIS — Up-to-date Microsoft customers are safe from the purported National Security Agency spying tools dumped online, the software company said Saturday, tamping down fears that the digital arsenal was poised to wreak havoc across the Internet .
LONDON - The voter registration site used ahead of Britain’s referendum on whether to leave the European Union may have crashed because it was attacked by foreign powers, a committee of lawmakers said Wednesday.
WASHINGTON — U.S. authorities announced Monday they are working to dismantle a global computer network that sent hundreds of millions of spam emails worldwide each year. The Russian man alleged to be at the head of the scheme was arrested Friday in Spain.
OTTAWA — The RCMP confirmed Wednesday what civil liberties groups say has been an open secret for them for some time: that the Mounties use so-called mobile device identifiers, also known as Stingrays, to identify and locate cellphones.
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